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The word sustainable basically means to perpetuate existence and to provide sustenance and nourishment. But it is most often associated with the environment and particularly to our yards and gardens. What do we really mean by a sustainable garden? Well, it is an organic garden that took a step further.

 

The main advantage with an organic gardening practice is that it will sustain soils and plants. As a result, it nourishes and sustains your family, both physically and aesthetically. Here are some ways that pursue the goal of a sustainable yard.

 

Grow healthy plants

 

When choosing what kind of plants to have, opt for those that will thrive where they are planted. Do your own
research and know various plant requirements. It is also important that you know your site well. Find out what nutrients are needed in your yard. If you want to retain water, minimize weeds and reduce stress to your plants,
you can have mulch in your yard. Using the trees around your home for shade and cooling. Trees are beneficial to our environment as it stores large amounts of carbon.

 

Manage pests

 

Meanwhile, opt for plants that are resistant to common diseases and other insect problems. Inspect your yard and look for pests to prevent them from propagating. Take note that sanitation is also an important step in pest prevention. Whenever you really need to apply pesticides, opt for a less toxic alternative instead of harsh chemicals.

 

Water wisely

 

To conserve water, try to use drip irrigation. You can avoid water pollution by keeping stormwater runoff on your property. To keep water where it falls, use rain gardens, rain barrels and permeable pavements. It is also advisable that you water early in the morning to reduce evaporation.

 

Recycle your yard trimmings

 

When mowing, do not collect and remove grass clippings. Just leave them on your lawn as they add valuable nutrients. You can also have a compost yard and organic waste from your home. Moreover, try to create your own natural mulch and fertilizer.

 

 

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1)    Realize that lawn chemicals are dangerous. Find out the brand names of the lawn care product ingredients you have. Then, visit their website and see their “What Can You Do?” section. Read the content and do your own research.

 

2)    It is recommended to opt for eco-friendly and organic lawn care practices. Either you do it yourself  or you hire someone to do it for you, it is highly recommended that you select an organic and eco-friendly service. If you already have someone doing the work for you, tell him to avoid using chemical fertilizers and synthetic pesticides. In its place, encourage instead the use of organic fertilizers and soil enhancers.

 

3)    Be a Good Neighbor:

-          Before you spray any pesticide in your yard, inform your neighbors about it in advance. Those harmful chemicals must also be kept away out of their homes.

-          Whenever you apply pesticides, it is also important to post a poison notification sign on your front yard. Doing so, your neighbors will know in advance that they have to stay away from it. Remember that the chemicals should not reach the sidewalk in order to avoid people stepping on them.

-          Never apply lawn chemicals before a rain as they might run-off into the storm drains, waterways, and neighboring yards. Try to recommend the same practice to your lawn care service as well.

 

4)    Whenever there are people coming in to your house, have to take off their shoes at your front door. Bear in mind that lawn pesticides can reach inside your home and usually, it remain on floors and carpets.

 

5)    If you have a dog, don’t let it to sniff yards that use pesticides. There are a number of studies that link certain canine cancers to synthetic pesticides.

 

6)    If your neighbor’s lawn care service provider will be spraying pesticides, you have the right to ask for an advance warning from them. In several states in the US, they have laws that require the service to give you a notification within 24 hours if you request it.

 

7)    As much as possible, avoid using gas-powered lawn machinery. If you have a lawn service provider to do the job, ask them to use an electric or hand mower, or instead of using a leaf blower, a rake is better. This technology contributes to carbon emissions, air pollution, and use up fossil fuels.

 

8)    Try to reduce your lawn to what you just need. You can replace the rest with native and drought-resistant plants and gardens. In this way, you save water and filters storm-water pollution. In addition, you are also saving manpower and cost.

 

9)    On your front yard, put a “Pesticide-Free Zone” Ladybug sign. With this, the passers-by will know beforehand that your yard is safe for them to leave their windows open, their kids to play, and their pets to sniff.

 

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Painting your house - getting started

 

Color is obviously one of the main considerations when it comes to painting a house. Deciding which color to use is largely based on two aspects. That is, the room you are planning to paint and your own personal taste. In general, neutral options such as off-white, light grey or taupe can be a good option as these provide a subtle alternative to basic white walls. If you are fixing up your property with the intention to sell it at a later date, it is also a good choice. Bear in mind that when painting your house, buyers usually opt for gentle and neutral colors rather than vibrant hues. A vibrant shade on the other hand, can be a good choice if you plan to stay put for a while, want to introduce a color or create a feature wall in a bedroom, kitchen, or bathroom.

 

House painting - tools and accessories

 

First, have an estimate of how much paint you will need to finish the job. Paint itself is not the only thing to think about, you also have to consider about other things that are needed to complete your house painting project. For example, protective tape and sheets or drop cloths can be used to protect your floors and skirting boards.

 

Meanwhile, the kind of brushes that are best suited to your space must also be decided as well. If you want to use rollers, take note that they are a quick and easy solution for painting large, flat walls, while brushes are better suited to smaller spaces such as corners and window sills. Paint trays and brush cleaner might be needed so that you can reuse your tools after the job has been finished. If it is a one-off job or short-term project, try to consider renting the gear that you need and then you can return it at the end of your DIY task. Also wear those old clothes as you might get a bit messy.

 

Painting a home - finishing the job

 

After you are done with your painting task, cleaning up is also another undertaking. Before rearranging your furniture, make sure that your walls are already dried. Clean your house painting supplies so that you can use it for future projects. Any leftover paint can also be used for future emergency touch-up jobs and if you don't need it, just dispose of it properly.

 

 

 

 

 

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When you find that your old kitchen is no longer doing the job, you might be on a dilemma to renovate it or rip it all out and have a brand new kitchen. This article will discuss the pros and cons of both.

 

Pros and Cons of Renovating a Kitchen

 

Once you decided that you go for kitchen renovation, try to have a look at the condition of your existing kitchen first. If your kitchen is still in good condition, then, a facelift might be all you need for it to look good.

 

You can replace the benchtops, cabinet doors and drawer fronts first. Then, you can have a new splashback, new paint, and maybe even consider new flooring and appliances. With all of these, you have to do your own research for its costs and make sure that you will save money by renovating as compared to having a brand new one. Otherwise, opt for a brand new kitchen.

 

Pros and Cons of a Brand New Kitchen

 

The main advantage with having a brand new kitchen is that you are able to start all over again from the ground up. With this, you get to make all the decisions regarding colors, style, layout, etc. If you found something that is not working properly, you can change it at ease without incurring too much cost especially for the plumbing and electrical wiring jobs.

 

Moreover, you can pick the appliances that are best suited according to your needs. Also think in advance in order to get the most out of your new kitchen. If you might need a larger oven or fridge later, make sure that you allow enough space for such appliances.

 

Having an entirely new kitchen can be very expensive. Thus, set a budget in your planning stage and stick to it. 

 

 

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Take the home out of your house.  One of the most important things to do when selling your house is to de-personalize it. The more personal stuff in your house, the less potential buyers can imagine themselves living there. Get rid most of your stuff – put it in storage. This includes family photos, memorabilia collections and other personal stuff. Consider hiring a home stager to maximize the full potential of your home. Staging simply means arranging your furniture to best showcase the floor plan and maximize the use of space.

 

 

Empty your closets.   Storage is something every buyer is looking for and can never have enough of. Take half of your stuff out of your closets then neatly organize what’s left in there. Buyers will poke around, so be sure to keep all your closets and cabinets clean and tidy.

 

 

Light it up.   After the location, good light is the one thing that every buyer cites that they want in a home. Maximize the light in your home. Take down the drapes, clean the windows, change the lampshades, increase the wattage of your light bulbs and cut the bushes outside to let in sunshine. Do what you have to do make your house bright and cheery – it will make it more sellable.

 

 

DECLUTTER.  Donate to a good cause. Early in your journey towards simplicity, one of the decluttering techniques you should do was to grab a simple large trash bag and fill it with stuff that you do not need anymore.

Creating a list of places/areas in your home to declutter beginning with the easiest. When you’re done with one area, stop and continue with the others. This list could be made as easy or difficult as you desire based upon what areas of your home make up the list (drawers/closets/rooms) and could easily fit into any schedule.

As you set to minimalism, this was the technique most often used in their homes, the The Four-Box Method. As you set out to declutter an area, bring four boxes: trash, give away, keep, or relocate. Each item in every room should be placed into one of the four categories. No item should be passed over. Each should be considered individually. Some projects took an hour  others took days or weeks. But the technique and principles remained the same.

 

 

COMMUNICATE.   Have open communication with your agent. You only get one chance to make a first impression on your buyers as well so there’s no harm if we do things all out.

 

 

 LIGHT-FILLED PHOTOGRAPHS.  The first thing a perspective buyer will see is the photos of your home.  You want them to want to come see the house either at a showing or an open house.  Make sure you take the photos from the best possible angle.  Make sure to clean up the spaces before taking photos.  Buyers also like bright and light spaces so try and take your photos on a sunny day rather than rainy.  You could also add fill light in photo editors just to enhance a little bit more.

 

 

FRAGRANCE.  This is a big one! We rely so much on our sense of smell. Take out all the unsighlty odors that can turn buyers right off. You could put or light a scented candle in your desired space in the house during open houses. 

 

 

PRICE TO SELL.  We all know that everyone wants  a bargain. Do your research and know what the houses are selling for in your same home size / area.  If you price your home at 900K and the homes your size in your town are selling for 400K, well, then you’re house will not sell quickly unless it is diamond encrusted.

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 Tips for Taking on Your First Home

 

 

 

After you've freed yourself of your college stuff  and your roommate's attempt at economy, it's time to plan for turning your empty and boring shell of a house into an inviting home. Moving into your first house is a kind of liberating in a way. Landmark life passage as it were. Here are some suggestions for achieving it:

 

 

Clean your house at the old place. Even before you decide to take on a new place, get ahead of the game by starting this. This censorious first step will not only make your current room  easier to pack up, but it will put you miles and miles ahead during move-in. Be strong and don’t dwell on every of your old stuff: wobbly furniture in the attic, faulty appliances in the garage, questionable accessories you received as social gifts. This is the right time to start over. Trim down your acquired possessions to the minimal amount. Have a garage sale, auction it off on eBay or donate it to charity-this way you’ll feel the light of everything.

 

 

Start with the bedroom. If you're on a tight budget, opt for new bedding first, but don't cut back on thread count!  It's where you'll be spending almost all of your time when you're at home, after all. Buy as well everything you can afford to spend in this area — it makes a really big difference. If you have an extra money tucked in somewhere, paint the bedroom walls to complement your new bedding. If you have more cash pocketed in somewhere, add coordinating window treatments. Early risers should opt for a lighter palette of colors and more translucent treatments. Night owls who like to sleep in will probably likely be more satisfied with deeper tones and more substantial coverings that block out the light. If you're really ready to spend your money extravagantly, buy that bed you've always dreamed and drooled about. And choose carefully. It should mirror your personality, fit your room comfortably and stay with you for so many years.

 

 

Fight the urge to match. Retail stores loves to keep the delusion that everything has to match alive. They would insist you on buying everything in sets, but don't do it! A few pieces with the same styling are fine, but any more than that and your home has the most lifeless, generic look of a furniture showroom. Top priority should be proportion, scale and balance of your furniture and accessories within each room.. It will look like a clown car. Conversely, putting only a low buffet and a delicate, round dining table. Make sure your own personal style shows through, which most likely isn't bland, beige and boring.

 

 

Tie everything together with color. The easiest, most economical way to fix the furniture that spans the 1960s to now  you brought with you is to integrate it through it’s color. Let's say you have a sofa that has only one thing in common with the furniture in the rest of your living room: a tiny bit of the color in the fabric is the same as the less dominant color in the rest of the room's upholstery. The solution is, play up that similarity and make it your living room's unifying wall color. If that's too much hard work for you, find curtains, rugs or accessories in this common hue and see how the pieces complement each other.

 

 

Don't buy everything all at once. Making sure is not a bad thing, but you have to think wisely on where each one of the things should be placed and not how many things should be placed. Live in your new house for at least two months before you make any important purchases. How you think you're going to use the house and how you actually live in the house are commonly two different things. Maybe that $3,000 you were going to spend on renovating the bathroom isn't quite as important as beefing up the living room for maximum entertaining purposes. And you may as well figure out that the living room loveseat would work much better in your master bedroom and the master bedroom's reclining chair will work better in the den. 

 

 

Solve practical problems inexpensively .Don't bother installing overly decorative (and very expensive) cabinet hardware on cheaply manufactured woodwork — it will only look out of place and the money can be put to better use elsewhere. If your kitchen cabinets are monotonous, for instance, revitalize them with paint and change out the hardware that was being used. In the bathroom, something as simple as replacing the lighting can immediately improve the room's appearance. If you find the typical incandescent R-type lamps in your new place, replace them with the less "yellow" PAR-type bulbs. Another inexpensive solution with a big payoff is installing dimmer switches to keep light levels low for a midnight bathroom break or to create a romantic mood with wine for bubble baths for two.

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Three Things to Consider when Making an Investment in Real Estate.




Real estate is one of the most risky things to invest to, but it could also be one of the greatest things to invest into if you were able to choose the right property and manage it well. Investing in real estate needs patience for it does not really pay off immediately, it takes time for one to build, assess, and improve a property for it to be profitable. Here are some of the things to consider in choosing a property to invest into:

 

 

THE PROPERTY IS POTENTIALLY PROFITABLE


Spending your heard-earned money on a property can either be a win or a lose, risks are high, that is why before spending your money on real estate, be sure that the property you are going to buy is somehow profitable. Let’s take land properties as our example, buying a 205-squaremeter along-the-highway lot for an expensive price is way more profitable than buying a 250-squaremeter subdivision lot for the same price. Though the lot area in the subdivision is wider, the opportunities of earning from the said property can be narrow. Unlike the along-the-highway lot, the opportunities are countless. You may even have a hard time thinking of ways how to stop earning from it.

 

 

SAY NO TO HIGHER RISKS


We cannot deny the fact that indulging to real estate investment is really risky, the risks are surely unavoidable but they can be lessened. Always be sure to check the background of the property before deciding to purchase it. A property doesn’t always have to be profitable; sometimes you just have to make sure that it’s worth the money you paid for it. Always remember that in buying or investing in a property, never settle for less.

 

 

NO TIME? NO PROBLEM!


There are a lot of things to do other than managing the improvement of your newly bought property. Deciding what to do to your newly purchased property can be very involved just ensure that when you make your decision, never settle for a project that won’t take you too much time to manage. Think of possible businesses that only require less supervision. Indeed, no time? No problem.

Those are just some of the guidelines to help you determine whether or not you are making the right investment. At the end of the day, every decision you are going to make still lies with you, the buyer.

 

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The rate of buying and selling of homes in Greater Vancouver ended with a bang, exceeding last year’s pace and slightly below the 10-year average for the month.

 

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that there is a 52.5% increase in domestic property sales when comparing the 1,649 residential property sales from August 2012, to August 2013, which boasts 2,515 properties sold. There is also a 14.7 decrease when August 2013 sales are compared to July 2012 sales, which reached 2,946.

 

Last month’s sales were 4.6 per cent below the 10-year sales average for the month.

 

“We’ve seen a healthy amount of demand in the marketplace this summer compared to the number of homes listed for sale,” Sandra Wyant, REBGV president said. “The market today is much stronger than we saw last year and is consistent with our long-term averages for this time of year.”

 

August brought in 4,186 new listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in the Greater Vancouver Area, a 3.5% raise when looking at the 4,044 new listings reported in August 2012 and a 13.8% decline from the 4,854 new listings in July of this year.

 

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on MLS® in Greater Vancouver is down 8.8% at 16,027, compared to August 2012 and a 3.6% decline from July 2013.

 

 

The sales-to-active-listings ratio currently sits at 15.7% in Greater Vancouver, and has remained consistent with balanced market conditions.

 

“People entering the market should not confuse stronger sales activity with rising prices. Home prices have been quite stable and consistent for much of this year,” Wyant said.

 

The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Greater Vancouver is currently $601,500, a 1.3% decline compared to August 2012 and an increase of 2.3%  since the beginning of 2013.

 

1,052 detached properties were sold in August 2013, an increase of 69% from the 624 detached sales recorded in August 2012, and a 3.1 per cent increase from the 1,020 units sold in August 2011. The benchmark price for detached properties decreased 2 per cent from August 2012 to $923,700.

 

1,018 apartment properties were sold in August 2013, a  40.4% increase compared to the 725 sales in August 2012, and an increase of 6.6 per cent compared to the 955 sales in August 2011. The benchmark price of an apartment property decreased 1.1 per cent from August 2012 to $366,100.

 

444 attached properties were sold in August 2013, a 48% increase compared to the 300 sales in August 2012, and a 10.2 per cent increase from the 403 attached properties sold in August 2011. The benchmark price of an attached unit decreased 1.1 per cent between August 2012 and 2013 to $457,000.

 

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Here's a look back on the refreshing change in selling activity in July. From the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver

July home sale activity increases in Greater Vancouver

 

Sunny weather did not slow the pace of home sale activity in July. Last month was the highest selling month of the year in Greater Vancouver and the highest selling July since 2009.

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential property sales in Greater Vancouver reached 2,946 on the Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in July 2013. This represents a 40.4 per cent increase compared to the 2,098 sales recorded in July 2012, and an 11.5 per cent increase compared to the 2,642 sales in June 2013.

Last month’s sales were 0.1 per cent above the 10-year sales average for the month.
“Demand has strengthened in our market in the last few months, which can, in part, be attributed to pent-up demand from the slowdown in sales activity we saw at the end of last year,” Sandra Wyant, REBGV president said. 

New listings for detached, attached and apartment properties in Greater Vancouver totalled 4,854 in July. This represents a 1.1 per cent increase compared to the 4,802 new listings reported in July 2012 and a 0.4 per cent decline from the 4,874 new listings in June of this year.

The total number of properties currently listed for sale on the MLS® in Greater Vancouver is 16,618, which is an 8.1 per cent decrease compared to July 2012 and a 3.9 per cent decline from June 2013.
The sales-to-active-listings ratio rose two and-a-half percentage points between June and July to 17.7 per cent in Greater Vancouver. This is the highest this ratio has been in Greater Vancouver since April 2012.
The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Greater Vancouver is currently $601,900. This represents a decline of 2.3 per cent compared to this time last year and an increase of 2.3 per cent over the last six months.

“Home prices continue to experience considerable stability with minimal fluctuation throughout much of this year,” Wyant said. “This stability in price brings greater certainty to the home buying and selling process.”
Sales of detached properties reached 1,249 in July 2013, an increase of 59 per cent from the 787 detached sales recorded in July 2012, and a 13.7 per cent increase from the 1,099 units sold in July 2011. The benchmark price for detached properties decreased 3.1 per cent from July 2012 to $920,500.

Sales of apartment properties reached 1,210 in July 2013, an increase of 31 per cent compared to the 927 sales in July 2012, and an increase of 16.3 per cent compared to the 1,040 sales in July 2011. The benchmark price of an apartment property decreased 1.6 per cent from July 2012 to $368,300.

Attached property sales in July 2013 totalled 487, an increase of 27 per cent compared to the 384 sales in July 2012, and a 12.7 per cent increase from the 432 attached properties sold in July 2011. The benchmark price of an attached unit decreased 2.6 per cent between July 2012 and 2013 to $456,700. 
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After you've freed yourself of your college stuff  and your roommate's attempt at economy, it's time to plan for turning your empty and boring shell of a house into an inviting home. Moving into your first house is a kind of liberating in a way. Landmark life passage as it were. Here are some suggestions for achieving it:

 

Clean your house at the old place. Even before you decide to take on a new place, get ahead of the game by starting this. This censorious first step will not only make your current room  easier to pack up, but it will put you miles and miles ahead during move-in. Be strong and don’t dwell on every of your old stuff: wobbly furniture in the attic, faulty appliances in the garage, questionable accessories you received as social gifts. This is the right time to start over. Trim down your acquired possessions to the minimal amount. Have a garage sale, auction it off on eBay or donate it to charity-this way you’ll feel the light of everything.

 

Start with the bedroom. If you're on a tight budget, opt for new bedding first, but don't cut back on thread count!  It's where you'll be spending almost all of your time when you're at home, after all. Buy as well everything you can afford to spend in this area — it makes a really big difference. If you have an extra money tucked in somewhere, paint the bedroom walls to complement your new bedding. If you have more cash pocketed in somewhere, add coordinating window treatments. Early risers should opt for a lighter palette of colors and more translucent treatments. Night owls who like to sleep in will probably likely be more satisfied with deeper tones and more substantial coverings that block out the light. If you're really ready to spend your money extravagantly, buy that bed you've always dreamed and drooled about. And choose carefully. It should mirror your personality, fit your room comfortably and stay with you for so many years.

 

Fight the urge to match. Retail stores loves to keep the delusion that everything has to match alive. They would insist you on buying everything in sets, but don't do it! A few pieces with the same styling are fine, but any more than that and your home has the most lifeless, generic look of a furniture showroom. Top priority should be proportion, scale and balance of your furniture and accessories within each room.. It will look like a clown car. Conversely, putting only a low buffet and a delicate, round dining table. Make sure your own personal style shows through, which most likely isn't bland, beige and boring.

 

Tie everything together with color. The easiest, most economical way to fix the furniture that spans the 1960s to now  you brought with you is to integrate it through it’s color. Let's say you have a sofa that has only one thing in common with the furniture in the rest of your living room: a tiny bit of the color in the fabric is the same as the less dominant color in the rest of the room's upholstery. The solution is, play up that similarity and make it your living room's unifying wall color. If that's too much hard work for you, find curtains, rugs or accessories in this common hue and see how the pieces complement each other.

 

Don't buy everything all at once. Making sure is not a bad thing, but you have to think wisely on where each one of the things should be placed and not how many things should be placed. Live in your new house for at least two months before you make any important purchases. How you think you're going to use the house and how you actually live in the house are commonly two different things. Maybe that $3,000 you were going to spend on renovating the bathroom isn't quite as important as beefing up the living room for maximum entertaining purposes. And you may as well figure out that the living room loveseat would work much better in your master bedroom and the master bedroom's reclining chair will work better in the den. 

 

Solve practical problems inexpensively .Don't bother installing overly decorative (and very expensive) cabinet hardware on cheaply manufactured woodwork — it will only look out of place and the money can be put to better use elsewhere. If your kitchen cabinets are monotonous, for instance, revitalize them with paint and change out the hardware that was being used. In the bathroom, something as simple as replacing the lighting can immediately improve the room's appearance. If you find the typical incandescent R-type lamps in your new place, replace them with the less "yellow" PAR-type bulbs. Another inexpensive solution with a big payoff is installing dimmer switches to keep light levels low for a midnight bathroom break or to create a romantic mood with wine for bubble baths for two.

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Canadian housing starts increased 5 per cent in September to 193,627 units at a seasonally adjusted annual rate (SAAR).  The trend in Canadian new home construction edged up slightly to 188,440 units SAAR over the past six months, a rate that is roughly in-line with Canadian household formations.  On a year-over-year basis, housing starts were down 11 per cent.

New home construction in BC urban centres bounced back from a sizable decline in August, rising 17 per cent to 29,633 units SAAR . On a year-over-year basis, total starts were 10 per cent higher than September 2012. Single-detached starts were up 20 per cent over last year, while multiple starts rose 6 per cent. Through the first three quarters of the year, BC housing starts are down 5 per cent compared to 2012.


Looking at census metropolitan areas (CMA) in BC, total starts in the Vancouver CMA were up 1 per cent year-over-year at 1,731 units in September. Single family starts rose 15 per cent while multiples fell 2 per cent. Through the first three quarters of the year, Vancouver CMA housing starts are down 6 per cent. In the Victoria CMA, total starts were up 40 per cent compared to September 2012, due to double digit growth in both single and multiple starts. Year-to-date, VIctoria CMA housing starts are 8 per cent lower than 2012. New home construction in the Kelowna CMA fell 35 per cent year-over-year in September. The decline was the result of a steep drop in multiple unit starts compared to 2012. Year-to-date, Kelowna CMA housing starts are down 1 per cent compared to 2012. Single detached starts were 30 per cent higher. 
In the Abbotsford-MIssion CMA, starts were up 400 per cent at 130 total units compared to just 26 in September 2012. Year-to-date, total housing starts in the Abbotsford-Mission CMA have risen 91 per cent.


Source

BCREA ECONOMICS


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“How I can be mortgage free sooner?” All homeowners ask this all the time! Of course nobody wants to pay more for their own home. Here are some tips that can help you become mortgage free and even raise the level of equity in your home faster!


For example, let’s assume that I have a mortgage of $200,000 at a 3.99% interest rate with 25 years amortization was well as a monthly payment of $1050 in combined principle and interest.


  • Switching from monthly payments to bi-weekly payments cuts 3 years off of your mortgage.
  • Paying $100 more bi-weekly will shorten 5 years on your mortgage.
  • A lump sum of $1000 every year toward your mortgage cuts an additional 1 year from the life of your mortgage.

Now if you can do all these three things, you can be paying off your mortgage 9 years faster. So instead of a 25 year mortgage, now you’ll pay only 16 years! 

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Moe Pourtaghi


"Nothing brings me more joy than seeing my buyers & sellers have success in their Real Estate endeavours. I hope you find the articles on my blog inspiring and educating in your ventures." - Moe Pourtaghi

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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.